Category Archives: Uncategorized

Camp Aragats 2017

From July 17-20, the Aragats Foundation organized an archaeological summer camp for young girls from the town of Aparan. The mission of Camp Aragats is to offer children the opportunity to experience archaeology, learn the ancient history of their region, discover the excitement of science and history, and participate in an educational activity during the summer. The pilot project, organized by Lori Khatchadourian and Armine Harutyunyan, was a great success. More photos can be found on the Aragats Foundation’s Facebook page.

group-photo-for-blog

Young visitors

Project ArAGATS always welcomes visitors on site, of all ages. On July 16, an Armenian girl’s camp organized by World Vision stopped by the archaeological site of Aparani Berd, where we’ve been conducting excavations this summer. The children had a crash course in archaeological methods, and learned about the ancient past in their own town.
IMG_3197_2

Kasakh Valley Archaeological Survey (KVAS)

Thunderstorms, hail, lightning strikes, and Soviet land amelioration strategies have not kept the KVAS from achieving some great results already this summer. We are four weeks into the 2016 season and several new sites and finds–from both north and south of our base in Aparan–have come to light.

Kurgan_Cluster

A kurgan cluster recorded this year by the KVAS survey team on the banks of the Kasakh River.

In the upper valley we have recorded a number of intriguing Paleolithic sites, as well as a major kurgan cluster overlooking the Kasakh gorge itself, likely a Bronze Age cemetery. Looking southwards, an Early Bronze Age hilltop site in the vicinity of Vardenut Village connects this landscape to material acquired by the National Museum nearly 100 years ago without exact geographical attribution. Finally, we have also recorded, overlooking Aragats Village at the southern edge of the survey area, and a 4-hectare settlement much closer to Aparan, both of which likely date to the later Medieval era.

Tsaghka_Berd

A fortress provisionally named “Tsaghka Berd” and recorded this year by KVAS high on the slopes of Mt. Aragats. One extant wall over 2 m high is shown in this photo.

Over the second half of the field season we plan to continue our work in the southern portion of the survey area, recording sites on the slopes of Mt. Aragats from Aparan south to the villages of Shenavan and Hartavan. We’ll post more here as the site inventory expands through early August.

US Ambassador’s visit in the Cornell news…

http://cornellcas.tumblr.com/post/93778112160/ambassador-visits-armenian-excavation-site-the

Ambassador visits Armenian excavation site

Ambassador visits Armenian excavation site<br />
The U.S. Ambassador to Armenia recently toured an archaeological field site in that country, spending time with co-directors Adam T. Smith, professor of anthropology and Lori Khatchadourian, assistant professor and Milstein Sesquicentennial Fellow in the Department of Near Eastern Studies.<br />
John A. Heffern, U.S. ambassador to Armenia, visited the excavations of Project ArAGATS at Gegharot Kurgans, Gegharot Fortress and Tsaghkahovit. After his visit, he tweeted: “Nice get together tonight of @cornell archeology team, Armenia Arch Institute, World Bank, @amap, @USAIDArmenia @IDeArmenia. Great team.”<br />
Project ArAGATS is a collaborative archaeological research program dedicated to the exploration of southern Caucasia’s rich past and the preservation of modern Armenia’s diverse cultural heritage. It was founded in 1998 by Smith and Ruben S. Badalyan of the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography, Yerevan.<br />
 Read more about the project here. 

The U.S. Ambassador to Armenia recently toured an archaeological field site in that country, spending time with co-directors Adam T. Smith, professor of anthropology and Lori Khatchadourian, assistant professor and Milstein Sesquicentennial Fellow in the Department of Near Eastern Studies.

John A. Heffern, U.S. ambassador to Armenia, visited the excavations of Project ArAGATS at Gegharot Kurgans, Gegharot Fortress and Tsaghkahovit. After his visit, he tweeted: “Nice get together tonight of @cornell archeology team, Armenia Arch Institute, World Bank, @amap, @USAIDArmenia @IDeArmenia. Great team.”

Project ArAGATS is a collaborative archaeological research program dedicated to the exploration of southern Caucasia’s rich past and the preservation of modern Armenia’s diverse cultural heritage. It was founded in 1998 by Smith and Ruben S. Badalyan of the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography, Yerevan.

Toasting to tenure

Project ArAGATS celebrates the accomplishments of Dr. Ian Lindsay of Purdue University’s Department of Anthropology, who has joined the ranks of associate professors.  Congratulations, Ian!